Large dogs – Peet Corso http://peet-corso.cz/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 23:09:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://peet-corso.cz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Large dogs – Peet Corso http://peet-corso.cz/ 32 32 Man Arrested at St. Louis Dog House Heads to Big House | St. Louis Metro News | Saint Louis https://peet-corso.cz/man-arrested-at-st-louis-dog-house-heads-to-big-house-st-louis-metro-news-saint-louis/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:52:00 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/man-arrested-at-st-louis-dog-house-heads-to-big-house-st-louis-metro-news-saint-louis/ Click to enlarge United States District Court Thomas F. Eagleton. A 58-year-old California man was sentenced today to 30 years in federal court in St. Louis for drug trafficking and money laundering. In February, Lester “Unc” Bull pleaded guilty to a slew of charges and admitted to being part of a conspiracy that brought at […]]]>
Click to enlarge

United States District Court Thomas F. Eagleton.

A 58-year-old California man was sentenced today to 30 years in federal court in St. Louis for drug trafficking and money laundering.

In February, Lester “Unc” Bull pleaded guilty to a slew of charges and admitted to being part of a conspiracy that brought at least 100 kilograms of marijuana to the St. Louis area.

Bull claimed to have no involvement in the distribution of harder drugs, but Judge Stephen R. Clark found those claims “not credible,” according to a statement released this afternoon by the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

“In addition to the marijuana, Judge Clark found Bull responsible for 20 kilograms of methamphetamine, 5 kilograms of cocaine and 2.5 kilograms of fentanyl,” the statement said.

The operation was first suspected in 2016 when the United States Postal Inspection Service began investigating money orders purchased in the St. Louis area and used to transfer money to California.

Bull was arrested in October 2020 when investigators observed another individual believed to be part of the conspiracy leaving a home in Ferguson owned by Bull with 445 grams of methamphetamine.

Bull ran when investigators approached him. He jumped into a stream and was later discovered hiding in a doghouse several blocks away.

A large amount of money, drugs and weapons were recovered from Ferguson’s house which was under surveillance.

A few days later, a search of the house where Bull was staying revealed more drugs and weapons. Authorities also found “drug records” showing Bull sold more than 500 pounds of marijuana in 2019 and 2020.

Four other individuals associated with the plot have pleaded guilty. Two of whom have still not been convicted.

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Shelters see low adoption rates with large dogs | KSNF/KODE https://peet-corso.cz/shelters-see-low-adoption-rates-with-large-dogs-ksnf-kode/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 03:41:36 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/shelters-see-low-adoption-rates-with-large-dogs-ksnf-kode/ PITTSBURG, Ks. — A recent donation is helping fight pet adoptions in southeast Kansas. This weekend, the Southeast Kansas Humane Society waived all adoption fees for its dogs. It was made possible thanks to a grant from the association Petco Love. Jasmine Kyle, director of the Southeast Kansas Humane Society, said events like these often […]]]>

PITTSBURG, Ks. — A recent donation is helping fight pet adoptions in southeast Kansas.

This weekend, the Southeast Kansas Humane Society waived all adoption fees for its dogs.

It was made possible thanks to a grant from the association Petco Love.

Jasmine Kyle, director of the Southeast Kansas Humane Society, said events like these often help break down barriers in the adoption process, as well as draw attention to the low adoption rates seen by many shelters.

Kyle says: ‘Ours are down to 8% which is awful, while intakes are up 87% so what we’re seeing from this data is there are more animals than many houses right now, and what we also see when we look into the breeds are bigger dogs. A lot of people aren’t adopting bigger dogs, and that’s what a lot of shelters are crammed with right now. So what any animal shelter in our area needs are new homes for the big dogs, because your best dog breeds in Kansas will be your Labs, your Boxers, and they’re all big boys.
Currently, the Southeast Kansas Humane Society is at capacity.

And there are about 50 animals waiting to come in.

Kyle says it often takes three months to bring an animal to the shelter due to declining adoption rates.

If you would like to help, the shelter offers a foster care program, accessible via this link.

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“Gentle Giant” Dog Who Needs His Fur Forever https://peet-corso.cz/gentle-giant-dog-who-needs-his-fur-forever/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/gentle-giant-dog-who-needs-his-fur-forever/ Rupert is eight, but RSPCA staff have described him as a ‘pup at heart’. Geraldine Haynes, Worcester and Mid-Worcestershire Branch President and Dog Repatriation Coordinator, said: “We adore Rupert and really hope his perfect match is imminent. “Rupert is so loving and really has no idea how big he is as he leaps up to […]]]>

Rupert is eight, but RSPCA staff have described him as a ‘pup at heart’.

Geraldine Haynes, Worcester and Mid-Worcestershire Branch President and Dog Repatriation Coordinator, said: “We adore Rupert and really hope his perfect match is imminent.

“Rupert is so loving and really has no idea how big he is as he leaps up to greet you, jumping up to say hello and showering you with kisses.

“Although he is very strong, he walks well on a leash and only pulls if something particularly excites him.

READ MORE: Man handcuffed after ‘rescuing’ dogs from Newtown Road

“He really likes his walks but little and often would be best for him as he has a loss of muscle in his back legs so he would struggle to take long walks but as his muscles develop it should improve.

“He loves to play, but he’s more than happy to be entertained too – he’ll happily chase a ball a few times and then collapse to chew and throw the ball.”

READ MORE: Horse arrests M5

RSPCA staff added: “Gentle giant Rupert is a big softie and loves nothing more than a cuddle and a belly rub.

“If you can offer this beautiful boy a loving home with a secure garden, please visit This site and complete a perfect match form which should be emailed to ned@rspcaworcester.org.uk.

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Big dog walks into store, stays there for hours before cops reunite him with human | Tendency https://peet-corso.cz/big-dog-walks-into-store-stays-there-for-hours-before-cops-reunite-him-with-human-tendency/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 14:50:01 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/big-dog-walks-into-store-stays-there-for-hours-before-cops-reunite-him-with-human-tendency/ Video of cops rescuing a dog and reuniting it with its human after wandering around a store for hours was posted on Facebook. Some internet stories often show a sweet ending to an unfavorable situation. Just like that incident where a dog walked into a store and refused to come out. The Bradenton Police Department […]]]>

Video of cops rescuing a dog and reuniting it with its human after wandering around a store for hours was posted on Facebook.

Some internet stories often show a sweet ending to an unfavorable situation. Just like that incident where a dog walked into a store and refused to come out. The Bradenton Police Department took to their official Facebook page to share video of the incident and how officers were ultimately able to rescue the dog. Sharing may leave you smiling.

““So he just ENTERED?” Earlier this week, Bradenton police officers responded to a call from Dollar General on Manatee Ave. W. in reference to a giant dog that wouldn’t leave – and they really had need to close the store. 135 pounds. Bentley walked through a door and walked a few blocks to the store, where he spent a few hours browsing. The clerks went about their business until they really need to lock up! Bentley’s dad realized he was missing and was grateful the store and officers were looking after him. Luckily, Bentley has a microchip – or maybe a megachip?! “, they wrote.

The video opens to show the big dog standing inside the store. The clip also shows the officers petting the dog and even clicking pictures with him. The adorable video ends with the dog reuniting with his human.

Take a look at the post:

The video was posted a few days ago. Since sharing, it has racked up nearly 800 reactions and the numbers are only growing. The post also prompted people to post various comments.

“Body cam is EVERYTHING!!!!!! Such good things,” one Facebook user wrote. “He just wanted to check out the latest treat delivery,” another joked. “He was just living his best life, sniffing out all the bargains…he was definitely a little Lady Island shopper in his past life. Congratulations to the employees and to LEO, beautiful end, ”commented a third. “He buys dog food, of course! voiced a fourth.

What do you think of the post?

Close story

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Saskatoon is considering off-leash areas just for small dogs https://peet-corso.cz/saskatoon-is-considering-off-leash-areas-just-for-small-dogs/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 22:39:00 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/saskatoon-is-considering-off-leash-areas-just-for-small-dogs/ Small dogs and big dogs are different – and that’s why the city needs dedicated off-leash parks for the most punished dogs, according to a city government report. Thursday’s planning and development committee meeting report recommends that both Hyde Dog Park and Charlottetown Park have designated areas for small dogs. The city has received several […]]]>

Small dogs and big dogs are different – and that’s why the city needs dedicated off-leash parks for the most punished dogs, according to a city government report.

Thursday’s planning and development committee meeting report recommends that both Hyde Dog Park and Charlottetown Park have designated areas for small dogs.

The city has received several requests over the years for such spaces due to concerns about animal and owner safety, the report said.

“While the city’s current dog parks provide a great place for pets to exercise and burn off excess energy, it’s important to understand that large and small dogs are different, both in size and inherent behavioral traits,” the report said.

“Even without intent, a large dog could injure a small dog through exercise and physical play. Establishing designated areas, or separation in existing dog parks, for small dogs could help prevent unnecessary conflicts and improve park safety for owners and their pets.”

A small doggo would be defined as weighing 20 pounds or less and no taller than 16 inches from the shoulder.

The additions are estimated at $95,000 for construction and $5,700 for operation and maintenance each year.

If the committee and then city council approve the work, the administration will proceed with a tender and construction, the report said.

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Palliative Dog Rescue Hosts Sixth Annual “Running of the Chihuahuas” https://peet-corso.cz/palliative-dog-rescue-hosts-sixth-annual-running-of-the-chihuahuas/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 21:41:11 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/palliative-dog-rescue-hosts-sixth-annual-running-of-the-chihuahuas/ Pet parents flocked to rural West Kingston on Sunday for the sixth annual Running of the Chihuahuas. After a two-year hiatus, due to the pandemic, the pint-sized pups were once again the stars of the show. The sixth annual event pits Chihuahuas in a series of races to crown a king or queen. There was […]]]>

Pet parents flocked to rural West Kingston on Sunday for the sixth annual Running of the Chihuahuas.

After a two-year hiatus, due to the pandemic, the pint-sized pups were once again the stars of the show.

The sixth annual event pits Chihuahuas in a series of races to crown a king or queen.

There was also a separate division for “chihuahua wannabes”, which is reserved for other breeds under 10 pounds.

“Yeah, I finally lifted the restrictions, and we thank God for that. So now we’re having fun again,” said Bill McCormick, who helps run dog shelter Sheba’s Haven.

Read more:

Kingston Humane Society faces unprecedented number of dogs

Sheba’s Haven is a palliative dog shelter that takes in older dogs, usually with serious illnesses, and lets them live out their final years, months, or weeks freely and happily.

“I give them life. They can do whatever they want. that’s another problem, because I let them do what they want, so sometimes there are hectic times,” said Catherine Pokrywa, who founded the dog shelter.

Since its inception in 2001, Pokrywa says it has bred over 100 dogs.

The organization is an official charity and receives no government funding, which means it depends entirely on the generosity of the community.

This event is one of the largest in Sheba’s Haven.

Read more:

The Kingston Humane Society rescues and rehabilitates 6 feral dogs

“Oh I love it. I love meeting the people who support us and the other volunteers. I was going around to thank them and thank everyone who was here because they all help my cause,” added McCormick.

As for the big winner, Hank the Chihuahua cleaned up in the champions round to win the trophy as well as some goodies.

Attendees enjoyed food, refreshments and lots of laughter.

It was a canine afternoon full of fun, fur and funds raised for a good cause.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Animal Emotions: Does Your Dog Know When Your Cat Is Angry? https://peet-corso.cz/animal-emotions-does-your-dog-know-when-your-cat-is-angry/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/animal-emotions-does-your-dog-know-when-your-cat-is-angry/ In his seminal work About the origin of species, Charles Darwin describes natural selection, a theory that has become the foundation of modern evolutionary biology. But fewer people know about his third major work on the theory of evolution, The expression of emotions in humans and animals. In it, Darwin explains why emotions, like other […]]]>

In his seminal work About the origin of species, Charles Darwin describes natural selection, a theory that has become the foundation of modern evolutionary biology. But fewer people know about his third major work on the theory of evolution, The expression of emotions in humans and animals. In it, Darwin explains why emotions, like other traits, adapt and change over time.

Although unpopular at first, most scientists now agree that emotional expression has been conserved across species because emotional intelligence plays such a critical role for animals. Animals use emotions to react to events they find meaningful. When we express emotions, others pay attention. Sometimes our emotions trigger an automatic, subconscious emotional response in the receiver. Researchers describe this effect as “emotional contagion.” In other words, emotional contagion is the beginning of basic empathy, the ability to be affected by the emotional state of others and to share it. Empathy can amplify emotions within a group, strengthening social bonds.

We know that emotional contagion is a powerful force in humans. Research has also shown that it occurs in the social lives of dogs, bonobos, mice, and pigs. But whether emotional contagion could occur between species is another question.

Can animals understand other people’s emotions?

Because different species can be so familiar with each other – think of a dog and its owner – it makes sense that we have learned to perceive and discriminate between emotions to facilitate cross-species interactions. Several studies have sought to determine whether nonhuman animals can interpret vocal or facial emotional cues from humans. This work has provided us with empirical evidence to back up what all pet owners know – dogs, cats, horses, and even mice can understand and respond to our emotions.

But no studies have investigated whether nonhuman animals can distinguish between emotions in the vocalizations of other nonhuman species. So we know your dog can tell when you’re angry. But can he understand your cat’s annoyed meowing? This information is important: understanding how animals interpret the vocalizations of closely related species is essential to understanding the interspecific perception of emotions. It also gives us important clues about the evolution of emotional perception. To further this understanding, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and ETH Zurich observed a number of animals: domesticated horses, wild horses (in particular, a breed called Przewalski’s horse), domesticated pigs and boars. They tested whether these animals could distinguish between positive and negative emotions in members of their own species, related species and humans.

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Their results showed that all species except wild boars could distinguish between positive and negative emotional displays of members of their own species, members of another closely related species, and humans.

Research provides ample evidence in support of cross-species perception of emotions. It also shows that different animals probably learn emotional intelligence in different ways.

If you’re happy and you know it, wag your tail

First, the researchers recorded the sounds of different individuals of each species. Half of the animals were female and the other half male, and the sounds were recorded when they were in negative or positive emotional states.

Researchers placed animals in contexts believed to induce positive and negative emotions. For example, sometimes the animals were reunited or separated with other members of the group. In other cases, researchers provided or withdrew food, water, and toys. The researchers used accepted indicators such as body position, as well as physiological indicators – heart rate, respiratory rate, etc. – to confirm whether the animal felt pleasant or unpleasant emotions. When the researchers analyzed the recordings, they found that the acoustic structure of the vocalizations (neighs for horses and grunts for pigs) differed depending on the situation.

For the humans, the researchers used voice actors from a validated database as they expressed joy, amusement, anger and fear. In these recordings, the actors did not use meaningful phrases or words. This controlled for the possibility of pets responding to the word, not the emotion.

The researchers exposed the animals to all positive and negative recordings from members of their own species, closely related species, and humans. Thus, a domestic pig has heard noises from other domestic pigs, as well as wild pigs and humans. The researchers reproduced the noises on loudspeakers, ensuring that latency and time between recordings were equivalent across species. The only characteristics that changed were the speaker and the type of emotion expressed.

Measuring emotional contagion in animals

The researchers measured a series of physical cues to determine how the animals responded to sounds. They recorded the animals’ responses and then used a blinded study design – the researchers were unaware of the treatment being used when they recorded the animals’ responses. Observers looked for a suite of responses, including reactions to the speaker (approaching, looking at, or avoiding the speaker); movements (standing, walking, running or trotting); head movements (particularly ear movements, such as the proportion of time spent with the ears perpendicular, rear-facing or forward-facing); tail movements; and vocalizations.

Both domestic and wild horses responded more strongly to readings when the vocalizations were negative than when they were positive. They spent more time walking and paid more attention to the speaker. This happened regardless of whether the speaker played the sounds of conspecifics, related species, or humans. Domestic pigs also reacted more strongly to negative emotions of all species.

Interestingly, the boars did not react to the noises of other boars, nor to those of humans. However, when the boars heard the vocalizations of the negative or positive cries of the domestic pigs, they moved their heads more often, produced more cries and remained with their tails high and erect for a long time.

All species reacted most markedly in all cases to closely related species or conspecifics, and less markedly to a human voice.

Overall, domestic horses, Przewalski’s horses, and pigs distinguished vocal indicators of positive and negative emotions in all species, but boars only responded to calls from domestic pigs. These results suggest that the emotional responses of horses and pigs may arise from different mechanisms, such as relatedness and domestication.

The foundation of empathy?

In some situations, animals reflected the emotions they were exposed to, especially negative emotions. The researchers did not directly test this type of emotional contagion, which has long been considered the first step towards empathy. Yet their research will likely inspire other behavioral biologists to assess the emotional intelligence and capacity for empathy in these and other animals.

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Dogs sniffed out COVID-19 more accurately than some lab tests, study finds https://peet-corso.cz/dogs-sniffed-out-covid-19-more-accurately-than-some-lab-tests-study-finds/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 21:25:39 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/dogs-sniffed-out-covid-19-more-accurately-than-some-lab-tests-study-finds/ article FILE – A Bristol County Sheriff’s Officer drives his Covid K-9 hunter to sniff a hallway at Wood Elementary School in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, U.S., Wednesday, January 19, 2022. (Allison/Bloomberg dinner via Getty Images) A recent study conducted in France found that trained dogs were able to detect COVID-19 as well as, or better than, […]]]>

FILE – A Bristol County Sheriff’s Officer drives his Covid K-9 hunter to sniff a hallway at Wood Elementary School in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, U.S., Wednesday, January 19, 2022. (Allison/Bloomberg dinner via Getty Images)

A recent study conducted in France found that trained dogs were able to detect COVID-19 as well as, or better than, a regular COVID-19 lab test.

The study results, which were published in the peer-reviewed journal Plos One on June 1, showed dogs detected the virus with 97% to 100% accuracy by smelling a participant’s sweat.

To compare, the nasal swab COVID-19 tests that were used in the study were only 84% accurate when compared to results obtained from dogs.

The researchers conducted the experiment at the Alfort School of Veterinary Medicine using dogs loaned from a French fire department and the UAE Interior Ministry.

A total of 335 adults (143 symptomatic and 192 asymptomatic) participated in the experiment. Using the nasal swab test, 109 out of 335 adults tested positive for COVID-19 and of those 109, 31 were asymptomatic.

Dogs were less accurate in detecting patients who tested negative for COVID-19 compared to lab tests (90% versus 97%), but just slightly less, according to the study.

The study authors claimed that the results of the experiment could provide a faster, less invasive alternative to detecting COVID-19, but noted limitations such as the limited supply of properly trained dogs and fear. of some participants towards animals.

“Further studies will focus on direct dog sniffer to assess sniffer dogs for mass pre-testing at airports, ports, train stations, cultural activities or sporting events,” the researchers said.

It was also noted that the dogs were appropriately rewarded with toys and their welfare was “fully respected”.

Dogs and detection of COVID-19 in the United States

Meanwhile, in Massachusetts, the Bristol County Sheriff’s Office has become the first in the United States to deploy COVID-sniffing K-9s to the area.

14-month-old Labrador Retrievers ‘Huntah’ and ‘Duke’ work weekly at 15 Bristol County schools searching and searching for the scent left behind by COVID-19.

“It gives the community a sense of a bit more security and knowing that at least if my child is going to school or my husband is working in an area, they won’t bring COVID home because the forces law enforcement are proactively looking to disinfect where these things might appear,” Sheriff Thomas M. Hodgson told Fox News in an interview in January of this year.

Dr. Kenneth Furton, founder of the COVID K-9 detection program at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, has spent much of his life researching canine olfaction. He wasted no time when the pandemic hit in March 2020, measuring a dog’s reliability at detecting COVID with a pure chemical called the Universal Detection Calibrator (UTC).

“So we found on average that the dogs are 97.5% accurate, which is actually higher than the PCR tests,” said Dr Furton, who is also the CRF provost. He thinks the COVID K-9 dogs have the potential to spread to other industries that expect large gatherings.

“If you were to have people checked by dogs on a cruise ship, you would immediately detect if they have COVID, without testing a few days before,” he said. “So here you have a big advantage in that regard.”

In 2021, Early Alert Canines, located in Concord, California, started a pilot program with the California Department of Health and the Association of Public Health Laboratories to detect COVID-19 from socks worn by previously infected patients.

Experts explained that in a human, most of the smell comes from the head, armpits, groin and feet.

“And looking at those options, we settled on the feet,” explained Early Alert Canines General Manager Carol Edwards.

Dogs do not sniff out the virus itself. Instead, their sense of smell picks up on the chemical changes bodies produce when fighting COVID.

A dog’s sense of smell is 100,000 times more sensitive than a human’s, according to the American Kennel Club. This super nose makes dogs the perfect tools for sniffing out bodies, drugs, and just plain reliable companions when trained properly to take on the tasks at hand.

FOX News and KTVU contributed to this report. This story was reported in Los Angeles.

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Big city mayors furious at mass shootings fear gun limits are out of reach https://peet-corso.cz/big-city-mayors-furious-at-mass-shootings-fear-gun-limits-are-out-of-reach/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 06:50:35 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/big-city-mayors-furious-at-mass-shootings-fear-gun-limits-are-out-of-reach/ “It gets really, really frustrating in areas like this where a mayor doesn’t have control,” said Mayor Steve Adler of Austin, Texas, a Democrat in a Republican-controlled state. He added that it was hard to tell a voter calling for new laws that “’I agree with you and wish I could change that but I […]]]>

“It gets really, really frustrating in areas like this where a mayor doesn’t have control,” said Mayor Steve Adler of Austin, Texas, a Democrat in a Republican-controlled state. He added that it was hard to tell a voter calling for new laws that “’I agree with you and wish I could change that but I have no control.’ This is an insufficient answer.

Mayor Kim Norton of Rochester, Minnesota, who unsuccessfully pushed gun control bills in her former role as the state’s Democratic legislator, said she wants the Legislature to state, where Republicans control a chamber, at least allow it to pass municipal gun restrictions, such as banning guns from the library or creating a weeks-long waiting period to purchase a gun. There is no indication that this will be the case. Ms. Norton is no longer affiliated with a political party.

Republicans opposed to increased gun control often point to places like Illinois, where guns are tightly regulated but homicides remain rampant, as proof that new restrictions won’t significantly reduce violence. Many instead called for investing in mental health programs, increasing funding for law enforcement and making schools safer. Democrats say they are missing the point.

“We don’t have the same conversation,” said Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway of Madison, Wisconsin, who wants tougher gun laws. “Half the conversation is about, ‘How can we keep letting people die unnecessarily?’ and half the conversation is, ‘I need my gun, it’s my constitutional right.’ We are not even at the same table to talk about it.

Ms Rhodes-Conway was among several mayors who described constantly preparing for a late-night alert about a mass shooting in their city.

For Mayor Jim Kenney of Philadelphia, it happened Saturday night in Reno during a routine phone check-in with an aide. More than a dozen people had been shot at a popular gathering place over the weekend, he was told, and three of them had died.

Mr Kenney, a Democrat who was due to leave the Nevada conference on Sunday evening, said he was considering taking an earlier flight or even going to San Francisco airport, but there was no good options to get home early. “It’s like, ‘What? What?’ Mr. Kenney said of his initial reaction to the shooting. ‘And I can’t get out.’

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Big dreams come to life in “Alebrijes: Creatures from a Dream World” at Parc de Cantigny | Latin Voice | Chicago News https://peet-corso.cz/big-dreams-come-to-life-in-alebrijes-creatures-from-a-dream-world-at-parc-de-cantigny-latin-voice-chicago-news/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 22:30:19 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/big-dreams-come-to-life-in-alebrijes-creatures-from-a-dream-world-at-parc-de-cantigny-latin-voice-chicago-news/ You might think you’re dreaming when you walk through the gates of Cantigny Park in Wheaton and spot giant, fantastical creatures like winged lemurs, two-headed dogs and rabbit-kangaroos frolicking among the flowers. Eighteen monumental versions of folk art known as alebrijes can be found in the park as part of the exhibition “Alebrijes: Creatures from […]]]>

You might think you’re dreaming when you walk through the gates of Cantigny Park in Wheaton and spot giant, fantastical creatures like winged lemurs, two-headed dogs and rabbit-kangaroos frolicking among the flowers.

Eighteen monumental versions of folk art known as alebrijes can be found in the park as part of the exhibition “Alebrijes: Creatures from a Dream World” presented at Cantigny Park by the Mexican Cultural Center Du Page in collaboration with the artist collective Meztli in Mexico City.

The art of alebrijes began with a dream. In 1936, a feverishly ill Mexico paper artist, or cartonero, named Pedro Linares said he dreamed of magically blended creatures exclaiming “alebrije!” When he recovered, he began making and selling colored papier-mâché versions of the beasts.

Today, alebrijes are a popular Mexican folk art, and many are made from wood. But the alebrijes on display at Parc de Cantigny are much closer to the original artist’s feverish dream of fantastical creatures that only existed in his imagination turned into papercraft.

Master artist Miriam Salgado named one of her creations “Tochtli” – the name derives from the Nahuatl term for rabbit.

“It’s a kangaroo rabbit jumpsuit and it also has an iguana crest,” Salgado said. “He’s a very happy bunny!”

Anglerfish by artist Edgar Camargo Reyes surfs above grassy waves in a hilly area of ​​the park.

“This is inspired by deep-sea fish and all of it, including the skull, is a representation of this type of sea animal at the bottom of the ocean,” he said of his alebrije, which is about the size of an SUV.

Inspiration for each alebrije’s intricate adornment can come from anywhere, the artists say.

“I am inspired by nature. And to develop those alebrijes, your mindset is very influential,” Salgado said. “The moment you develop the pattern, you are actually painting what you are feeling at that moment on the actual figure.”

Alberto Moreno Fernandez’s alebrije ‘Bicefalo’ depicts an inner battle between good and evil.

“It’s really centered on yin and yang. That’s why one head fights the other,” said Moreno Fernandez.

Moreno Fernandez said he had to consider the Midwest weather when planning “Bicefalo”.

“Even when the wind is blowing, the room doesn’t really move – it’s in balance.”

Arturo Zarate built his alebrije – a toucan, jaguar, bull and butterfly combination he calls the “Malucan” – with recycled materials like paper and plastic bottles he solicited via social media .

“My expression is to live with nature and the animals that are there and that’s how I designed my artworks,” said Zarate.

“It had a lot to do with endangered species – and the tendency of humans to take over animals that should actually be free.”

Zarate said that the spirit of Mexico and its people is also part of the Malucan.

“Hispanics have a lot of resilience and a lot of strength, and that reflects some of those strengths.”

The guest artists say they hope their big, shiny alebrijes inspire people to learn more about Mexico’s artistic traditions.

“We’re here in Chicago to represent just a tiny fraction of everything Mexico has to offer,” Camargo Reyes said.

“Alebrijes: Creatures from a Dream World” will be on display at Parc de Cantigny from June 12 to October 31, 2022 and includes 30 additional small sculptures throughout the park. The “Maquetas & Bocetos” exhibit will feature models and designs of the alebrijes through August 27 at Gallery 200, 103 W. Washington Street, West Chicago.


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