Animal welfare fund – Peet Corso http://peet-corso.cz/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 15:22:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://peet-corso.cz/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Animal welfare fund – Peet Corso http://peet-corso.cz/ 32 32 Animal welfare campaigners slam West Midlands council for ‘cruelty’ claims https://peet-corso.cz/animal-welfare-campaigners-slam-west-midlands-council-for-cruelty-claims/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 14:59:25 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/animal-welfare-campaigners-slam-west-midlands-council-for-cruelty-claims/ Wolverhampton Civic Center The fund is accused of investing more than £35million in livestock companies including JBS, Tyson and WH Group, three of the world’s largest factory farming organisations. That would make it the biggest local authority investor in the farming industry – ahead of Swansea (£12.4m) and Strathclyde (£10.3m). Tyson Foods slaughters 22,000 cattle, […]]]>
Wolverhampton Civic Center

The fund is accused of investing more than £35million in livestock companies including JBS, Tyson and WH Group, three of the world’s largest factory farming organisations.

That would make it the biggest local authority investor in the farming industry – ahead of Swansea (£12.4m) and Strathclyde (£10.3m).

Tyson Foods slaughters 22,000 cattle, 70,000 pigs and 7.8 million chickens daily according to a study published last year by the political foundation Heinrich Böll Stiftung, Friends of the Earth Europe and the Bund – Friends of the Earth Germany .

JBS is the world’s largest meat producer and has been linked to 100,711 acres of deforestation in the two years since March 2019 according to MightyEarth.org’s Soybean and Livestock Deforestation Tracker.

The West Midlands Pension Fund has also invested in dairy company Inner Mongolia Yili (Yili Group) which has been rated as ‘high risk’, including with respect to animal welfare, by the Coller FAIRR Protein Producer Index.

The research was conducted by non-governmental organizations Feedback and World Animal Protection. The team analyzed data from freedom of information requests made by the Office of Investigative Journalism in 2020.

Lindsay Duncan, Agricultural Campaigns Manager for World Animal Protection, said: “The reason intensive farming is known as ‘factory farming’ is because that is precisely how it works. .

“Large numbers of individual animals – each capable of feeling pain and suffering – are treated by systems designed to maximize efficiency and profit, operating at the expense of their welfare needs, negating their natural behaviors and trapping them in terrible conditions from birth to death.

“Several species of farm animals continue to suffer painful mutilations.

“For example, pigs can suffer multiple painful mutilations including – tail docking (cutting or cauterizing the tail of the pig); tooth cutting (cutting or grinding of teeth); castration (removing pig testicles); permanent identification (ear notch, ear tag or tattoo).

“These mutilations are often performed without anesthesia and in the first days of a pig’s life and are often ‘solutions’ to the problems created by intensive farming.

“Pigs have their tails docked to avoid tail biting, but tail biting in pigs occurs primarily out of frustration without the space and environment they need to engage in natural behaviors.

“Industrial farming uses animal breeds designed to grow as fast and produce as much as possible and, therefore, suffer unimaginable cruelty.

“Broilers reach slaughter weight in about six weeks – a weight that would naturally take about three months to reach. This rapid growth can cause serious health problems, such as painful lameness and strain on the animal’s heart and lungs.

“Because of these health issues and with little to do, factory-farmed chickens spend much of their lives sitting. Many endure constant pain from lameness.

Describing factory farming practices as “excruciatingly cruel”, Martin Bowman of Feedback said: “These factory farming companies are hardwired for profit and growth, which means getting as much ‘efficiency’ out of animals as possible. via what we would commonly call factory farming.”

Another factor behind calls for divestment is the impact of industrial agriculture on the environment.

Campaigners cited research from 2018 showing that the world’s five largest meat and dairy companies collectively emit more greenhouse gases than oil and gas giant ExxonMobil.

The West Midlands Pension Fund has 343,000 members and assets worth £11.5 billion, involves all seven West Midlands councils and is administered by Wolverhampton Council.

A spokesman for the West Midlands Pension Fund said the figures quoted had been questioned as they “do not appear to reflect our position”.

But he said he intended to make changes in the companies through “monitoring and risk engagement” rather than divestment.

They said: “Climate change is an existential threat and the defining problem of the modern age. It harms livelihoods and societies, threatens future food security and water availability, and negatively impacts local and global economies.

“The West Midlands Pension Fund (“WMPF / the Fund”) is fully committed to aligning with the Paris Agreement targets and net zero ambition by 2050 or earlier.

“As a pension fund and asset owner, we seek to understand the risks associated with climate change; ensuring the resilience of funds as we decarbonise; and advocate for effective collaboration and increased transparency in our approach, as we continue to navigate our way to net zero emissions and help build a sustainable future for all.

“Our 2021 climate change framework and strategy outlines our approach, how we will measure our progress and continue to adapt to the changing political and regulatory environment.

“As noted in the Fund’s Annual Management Report, WMPF has chosen four engagement themes for the period to 2023, two of which include climate change and sustainable food systems. WMPF believes that a sustainable food system is one that provides food and nutrition security for all in such a way that the economic, social and environmental foundations of future generations are not compromised.

“There has been a shift among consumers who are increasingly aware and concerned about the climate impacts of the food they eat and how it is produced sustainably.

“The WMPF recognizes the crucial role tropical forests play in combating climate change, protecting biodiversity and ensuring ecosystem services, which again impacts economic development as well as stability and sustainability. proper functioning of capital markets.

“In 2020, on behalf of WMPF, the Local Authority Pension Funds Forum (LAPFF) placed greater emphasis on the importance of preventing deforestation in order to stem climate change.

“Not only does climate change impact the planet, but so do the actions of modern society. WMPF is keenly aware of the damage single-use plastics have on the environment and is keen to engage with partners to highlight the risks single-use plastics pose to longer-term financial returns. .

“Through our pool company LGPS Central Ltd, we are taking advantage of opportunities to collaborate with investors, for example through the Principles for Responsible Plastics Investment Task Force and the Marine Plastics Pollution Project of the Forum of investors.

“Voting is engagement driven as much as possible, and LGPS Central will consider co-filing or supporting shareholder resolutions related to better risk management (reducing plastic use, reducing plastic waste, increasing recycling, investing in relevant research and development).

“Recipient companies with strong governance structures should be better placed to manage the effects of shocks and stresses from future events.

“Thus, as set out in the Fund’s responsible investment framework, the Fund prefers to adopt a risk monitoring and engagement policy in order to positively influence corporate behavior and enhance shareholder value, an influence that would be lost by a divestment approach.”

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SLO Co. Nonprofits Launch Snip & Chip Events for Better Animal Welfare https://peet-corso.cz/slo-co-nonprofits-launch-snip-chip-events-for-better-animal-welfare/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 02:53:30 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/slo-co-nonprofits-launch-snip-chip-events-for-better-animal-welfare/ Three San Luis Obispo County nonprofit organizations are joining forces to combat pet overpopulation and improve animal welfare by providing free spaying and low-cost wellness clinics. The project is called Snip & Chip SLO and is a collaboration between animal shelter adoption partners (ASAP) SLO and Animals in Need Fund, as well as CARE4Paws of […]]]>

Three San Luis Obispo County nonprofit organizations are joining forces to combat pet overpopulation and improve animal welfare by providing free spaying and low-cost wellness clinics.

The project is called Snip & Chip SLO and is a collaboration between animal shelter adoption partners (ASAP) SLO and Animals in Need Fund, as well as CARE4Paws of Santa Barbara County.

The first Snip & Chip SLO event takes place on Sunday, February 20 at Nipomo Dog & Cat Hospital.

Services include providing free spaying and neutering surgeries as well as low-cost vaccines, microchips and other essential pet care.

“San Luis Obispo County has too many unwanted animals,” says ASAP co-founder Terry Parry. “Over the years, various programs have increased the number of pet adoptions, but it hasn’t been enough. We’ve been around long enough to know we can’t get away with it. By increasing the access to free and low cost neuters/neuters, vaccines and microchips, Snip & Chip SLO will promote animal welfare and reduce the number of unwanted litters of puppies and kittens born, which will reduce the number of admissions and euthanasia rates at our Animal Services shelter.

Snip & Chip SLO will host several events, starting with pet wellness clinics on February 20 and March 20 at Nipomo. During these veterinary teams, the objective is to carry out at least 150 sterilizations/neuters.

Surgeries are offered by appointment, free or at low cost, to community members in need.

Appointment requests can be made at snipslo.org.

For more information about Snip & Chip SLO, including upcoming events, available pet welfare services, partner organizations and how to volunteer, visit this website.

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City to host shelter manager finalists https://peet-corso.cz/city-to-host-shelter-manager-finalists/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/city-to-host-shelter-manager-finalists/ The City of San Marcos will host a meet and greet to introduce the Animal Services Manager finalists at the San Marcos Rec Hall on Thursday, January 20 at 5 p.m. Candidates will introduce themselves at the start of the event, and community members are welcome to come and go as they please. The meet […]]]>

The City of San Marcos will host a meet and greet to introduce the Animal Services Manager finalists at the San Marcos Rec Hall on Thursday, January 20 at 5 p.m.

Candidates will introduce themselves at the start of the event, and community members are welcome to come and go as they please. The meet and greet is part of a two-day assessment that will give the community an opportunity to provide feedback to the hiring committee.

The first runner-up is Christie Banduch, who has 20 years of experience in the animal welfare and care field and currently serves as the Acting Animal Services Manager at the San Marcos Regional Animal Shelter.

Banduch has been at the shelter for two years. She took courses in veterinary technology and biology at Palo Alto College. While working at the town of Kirby, she gained support for a neuter and trap release (TNR) program that reduced the admission rate of cats and kittens by 80% over a period of two years, spearheaded an awareness initiative for low-cost neutering/sterilization, and established vaccination services, wellness clinics, a pet food pantry, and training programs. human education.

Over the course of her career, Banduch has established partnerships in the animal welfare community, including rescue groups, animal control agencies, and animal foundations. Banduch was the recipient of Maddie’s Fund Hero Award in 2017 in the rescue category and received a $10,000 grant that was used to subsidize spay/neuter vouchers for low-income pet owners.

Allison Harper, the second runner-up, has 14 years of local government experience in animal welfare and care and currently serves as Animal Services Manager for the Town of Brenham. In 2020, Brenham Pet Adoption Center was chosen to participate in American Pets Alive! Human Animal Support Services (HASS) which resulted in a 50% reduction in intake compared to the previous year.

Harper holds an associate’s degree in commercial photography from Seattle Central Community College and a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Kaplan University. Harper has raised over $30,000 in donations and grants and enhanced shelter adoption programs across multiple agencies, resulting in increased adoptions and the development of strong relationships with local veterinarians and local rescue organizations to promote a positive image.

Lauren Hartis has 15 years of local government experience in animal welfare and care and is currently the Animal Services Director/Guardian for the City of Humble and Secretary of the Boards of Texas Animal Control Association. Hartis received an associate’s degree from Animal Behavior College and completed a shelter medicine and veterinary technology program through Texas A&M.

Hartis has set up free spaying clinics, rabies programs and organized local events in the town of Humble. Hartis has developed several TNR programs that have improved adoptions through partnerships that support adoptions nationwide. Through a successful marketing campaign, which included coordination with agency partners, Hartis established a tracking program that allowed lost animals to be reunited with their owners prior to admission to the shelter. The selected finalist

The finalist selected through this process will be responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the San Marcos Regional Animal Shelter. For more information re

For more information regarding meet and greet, contact Linda Spacek at lspacek@sanmarcostx.gov.

agonzales

@sanmarcosrecord.com

Twitter: @alyssagonz89

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Animal welfare nonprofits expect a jolt on what would have been Betty White’s 100th birthday https://peet-corso.cz/animal-welfare-nonprofits-expect-a-jolt-on-what-would-have-been-betty-whites-100th-birthday/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 22:31:39 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/animal-welfare-nonprofits-expect-a-jolt-on-what-would-have-been-betty-whites-100th-birthday/ Animal nonprofits across the country are expecting a big round of donations this coming Monday as part of the #BettyWhiteChallenge. The late Betty White, who died on December 31 at the age of 99, was a tireless animal advocate, even creating her town’s television show “The Pet Set”, which aired from 1971 to 1972, where […]]]>

Animal nonprofits across the country are expecting a big round of donations this coming Monday as part of the #BettyWhiteChallenge.

The late Betty White, who died on December 31 at the age of 99, was a tireless animal advocate, even creating her town’s television show “The Pet Set”, which aired from 1971 to 1972, where celebrities brought their animals and were discussing pets. wildlife care, ecology and preservation.

While it’s unclear who started the movement on social media, celebrities such as Kristen Johnston and George Takei have shown their support for the challenge in honor of White’s longtime animal advocacy.

Animal welfare charities and pet shelters are also gearing up for Monday, which would have been White’s 100th birthday. The idea is to donate $5 to a local animal organization in White’s name. The variations of the chart have been shared over 200,000 times on different social platforms.

According to American Humane, the nation’s first national humanitarian organization, Betty White supported the organization for 70 years, longer than any other supporter in the organization’s history.

“We have seen such an increase in donations, all due to Betty White,” said Dr. Robin Ganzert, CEO and President of American Humane, on hello america. “Betty White would smile from heaven thinking of the Betty White Challenge on her birthday.”

A member of American Humane wrote that White has volunteered with the organization for decades, serving on its board of directors and even acting as a judge and presenter for the televised “American Humane Hero Dog Awards.” the organization. His long-standing commitment to the organization is one of the reasons they awarded him the National Humanitarian Medal in 2012, the highest honor within the nonprofit organization.

Animal organizations across the country are awaiting donations as part of the #BettyWhiteChallenge, asking people to donate $5 in the late actress’s name. NEW YORK, NY – MAY 16: Actress Betty White (R) and Uggie the dog attend the Friars Club Salute To Betty White at Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers on May 16, 2012 in New York City.
Jim Spellman/Getty Images

“I’ve had many conversations with Betty about animal welfare, and I know she’s looking down from the sky and really smiling,” Ganzert told the AP.

White even set up the Betty White Wildlife Fund in 2010, which provided $1 million to animal rescue and rehabilitation centers during Australia’s wildfires in 2020.

People previously reported that at one point White’s family had 26 dogs and when she was younger she dreamed of being a ranger.

Joanne Yohannan, senior vice president of the North Shore Animal League American in Port Washington, New York, also told the AP that they are dedicating the next 100 animal rescues to White in honor of her birthday.

Holly Sizemore, chief mission officer of the Best Friends Animal Society, told the Associated press that the #BettyWhiteChallenge raised over $25,000.

“What an incredible opportunity to honor Betty White’s legacy – to come together as a nation and celebrate something that she was so passionate about, her love for animals,” Sizemore said.

She said she hopes there will be even more donations on Monday.

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All That Jazz: This year’s Jazz Cat Ball honors Scott “Reg” Sign up for years of working with GBHS https://peet-corso.cz/all-that-jazz-this-years-jazz-cat-ball-honors-scott-reg-sign-up-for-years-of-working-with-gbhs/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 19:45:26 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/all-that-jazz-this-years-jazz-cat-ball-honors-scott-reg-sign-up-for-years-of-working-with-gbhs/ Jazz Cat Ball winner Scott Register, center, with Auxiliary Council members left to right: Tricia Preston, Allison Black Cornelius (GBHS CEO), Toni Seales, Scott Register, Donna O’Brien, Julie Clemons, Celeste David and Jocelyn Bradley Palmer. Board members not represented: Robert Alden, Margaret Ellis, Missy Ellis, Sharyn Gaston, Ramona Graffeo, Donna Hightower, Sharon Jackson, Christy King, […]]]>
Jazz Cat Ball winner Scott Register, center, with Auxiliary Council members left to right: Tricia Preston, Allison Black Cornelius (GBHS CEO), Toni Seales, Scott Register, Donna O’Brien, Julie Clemons, Celeste David and Jocelyn Bradley Palmer. Board members not represented: Robert Alden, Margaret Ellis, Missy Ellis, Sharyn Gaston, Ramona Graffeo, Donna Hightower, Sharon Jackson, Christy King, Cele and Allen Montgomery, Susan Norman, Melanie Perry and Sara Sciara.

By Ally Morrison

The Greater Birmingham Humane Society will host the 11th annual Jazz Cat Ball on April 30 in the Ballroom of the Sheraton Birmingham Hotel.

Scott Register, radio personality and former GBHS board member, is this year’s winner. Register, better known as “Reg”, said he was delighted and honored to be chosen as this year’s winner.

“If I can help them raise funds and continue to give a voice to the voiceless, it is a pleasure and an honor for me,” Register said.

Prior to working as host of The Morning Blend with Reg & Will with Reg’s Coffee House for Birmingham Mountain Radio, Register worked in Marketing and Advertising in Birmingham.

He was recommended for a seat on the board of directors of the Greater Birmingham Humane Society, where he continued to serve for approximately 12 years. Register has fallen in love with GBHS and takes its mission to heart.

“It was a natural fit for me. I am a big animal lover and their mission is important which makes the community a better place to live, ”said Register.

Register has attended several Jazz Cat events and was even crowned King of Jazz Cat Ball a few years ago.

“The Jazz Cat Ball is a huge fundraising event for the humanitarian society, it takes a lot of money to do what they do on a daily basis.” Sign said. “It’s not just about pets, it’s about people as well. The Jazz Cat Ball is a great opportunity for everyone to come together and celebrate their mission. I always leave with a smile on my face.

Register is celebrating 25 years of Reg’s Coffee House this month. When not working for radio, he also works for Think Indie Distribution, a distribution company that sells vinyls, CDs, and merchandise to record stores around the world.

“Somehow my hobby became my job 25 years ago and continues to be today, where I have the chance to do it in Birmingham,” said Register .

Register was born and raised in the Birmingham area, having grown up in Vestavia Hills, where he still lives with his wife, Dr Shae Hicks Register, a veterinarian, and their four children.

The Humanitarian Society was founded by Dr John Herbert Phillips in 1883, at the same time he founded the Birmingham School System and the Public Library System. Its mission is to promote the humane treatment of humans and animals.

The Jazz Cat Ball is one of the nation’s largest animal welfare fundraisers, featuring a casino, live music, and freebies. This year’s live music will be performed by The Big Beyond. It was originally scheduled for February 5, but this was changed to April 30 due to the recent increase in COVID cases.

Proceeds from the event are used to fund the operations of GBHS, which, in addition to the shelter, sponsors school-based education courses, conducts cruelty investigations, has one of the largest response units in disaster event in the South East and sponsors an externship program, which provides surgical education and training for fourth-year veterinary students at the faculties of veterinary medicine at Auburn University and Tuskegee University GBHS Executive Director Allison Black Cornelius said in a statement.

“We usually raise over $ 600,000, but the hope for this year is $ 1 million,” she said.

“The proceeds from the Jazz Cat Ball go to our annual budget as we run many school-based education classes, cruelty investigations and we are one of the largest disaster response units in the world. South East. GBHS Executive Director Allison Black Cornelius said. “We usually raise over $ 600,000, but the hope for this year is $ 1 million.”

The event will also fund the GBHS Clerkship Program, which provides surgical education and training to fourth-year veterinary students at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Auburn University and the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tuskegee.

The Greater Birmingham Humane Society plans to build a new campus on Lakeshore Parkway in 2022.

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Chronicle of Eliza Newlin Carney: The Civic Power of Charity | Chroniclers https://peet-corso.cz/chronicle-of-eliza-newlin-carney-the-civic-power-of-charity-chroniclers/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/chronicle-of-eliza-newlin-carney-the-civic-power-of-charity-chroniclers/ Donations increased for nonprofits focused on human needs, racial inequalities, and environmental and animal organizations, but were dropped for arts, culture and the humanities groups. Almost half (47%) of nonprofits reported serving fewer people by the end of 2020. Yet charities continue to demonstrate the power of Americans, both through charitable giving and volunteer hours, […]]]>

Donations increased for nonprofits focused on human needs, racial inequalities, and environmental and animal organizations, but were dropped for arts, culture and the humanities groups. Almost half (47%) of nonprofits reported serving fewer people by the end of 2020.

Yet charities continue to demonstrate the power of Americans, both through charitable giving and volunteer hours, to help solve massive problems that there is little the government can do to solve.

From public health and poverty crises triggered by the pandemic to global warming and disaster relief, social justice, animal welfare and the arts, Americans are donating millions of dollars and billions of dollars. volunteer hours to help each other, often neighbor to neighbor. On GivingTuesday in 2021, volunteering was also up 11% from 2020, and donations of food, clothing and other goods were up 8%.

For Americans wondering where their charity money could go the most, there is no shortage of guides, lists and leaderboards. According to Forbes, the top three charities in the country are United Way Worldwide, Feeding America, and The Salvation Army. But there are literally millions of local and civic groups, hundreds of them with tiny budgets, working to help their communities.

A “how to help” guide offered by CNN provides an overview of the diverse world of nonprofits across the country, including the Broadway Cares and Actors Fund groups, which provide financial assistance to struggling artists. The New York Times Holiday Gift Guide 2021 featured a series of articles from opinion writers on their favorite charities. For those who wish to research charities on their own, Candid collects and disseminates comprehensive data on the nonprofit sector.

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Collisions with ships can make the difference between extinction and survival of some endangered whale species https://peet-corso.cz/collisions-with-ships-can-make-the-difference-between-extinction-and-survival-of-some-endangered-whale-species/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 07:01:26 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/collisions-with-ships-can-make-the-difference-between-extinction-and-survival-of-some-endangered-whale-species/ Collisions with ships pose a serious threat to whales and can lead to the extinction of highly endangered subspecies. The remaining 1.3 million whales in our oceans face increasing maritime traffic as they rise to the surface and make their way to their feeding or breeding grounds. Global maritime traffic has increased quadrupled between 1992 […]]]>

Collisions with ships pose a serious threat to whales and can lead to the extinction of highly endangered subspecies.

The remaining 1.3 million whales in our oceans face increasing maritime traffic as they rise to the surface and make their way to their feeding or breeding grounds.

Global maritime traffic has increased quadrupled between 1992 and 2012. In some parts of the world, such as the Arctic, it actually doubled between 2013 and 2018. The number of whales, meanwhile, is declining.

Since commercial whaling was banned in 1986, the greatest measurable threat to whales has been bycatch. An estimated 300,000 a year drown after becoming entangled in fishing gear.

But there could be a bigger threat. Ship collisions, where ships collide with sea creatures, are not that easy to measure but can be just as deadly. The grim sight of a whale’s body, strapped to the bow of a boat entering a harbor, shows only a fraction of accidents.

“It is very difficult to know how many have actually been affected by some of these threats if their bodies are sinking and have never been found at sea,” said the policy director of Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society North America Sue Fisher.

Collisions with large vessels often go unnoticed and go unreported.

“Many whales end up stranded on shore with impact injuries that match those of a struck ship,” she adds.

For some populations, such as Critically Endangered North Atlantic Right Whale whose primary habitat is the busy waters off the east coast of the United States and Canada, the problem is even more serious. Mortality from collisions with ships can make the difference between extinction and survival, International Whaling Commission declares on its website.

Whales can make a big difference in the fight against climate change

Whales play an important role in maintaining healthy marine ecosystems and fighting climate change. They provide nutrients to phytoplankton which absorbs 40 percent of all the CO2 produced on the planet.

Giant marine mammals also sequester around 33 tonnes of CO2, or 1,500 times what a tree absorbs in a year.

Who can make the change?

The latent threat of large ships can be tackled by governments, operators and even consumers, according to the World Organization for Sustainable Development (WSO).

The NGO has launched a new project called “Save the Whales” following its “Friend of the Sea” certification program. Operators who join the program and meet a set of requirements, including in-depth whale watching and data exchange, can earn Whale-Safe certification.

“Even though the Whale-Safe project was only recently launched, two main shipping companies – Seatrade and GreenSea – are already certified for sustainable shipping,” said the founder of the World Sustainable Development Organization, the Dr Paolo Bray.

The NGO also recommends relocating some of the shipping lines that cross important feeding or breeding areas. According to its report, high-risk areas include the southern coast of Sri Lanka, the Hauraki Gulf in New Zealand, the Canary Islands and the Mediterranean Sea, among others.

The World Shipping Council trade association did not comment but said in its response that it was addressing the issue. He says he works closely with two environmental organizations; the International Fund for Animal Welfare and the Great Whale Conservancy.

The trade association, along with WSO, is also working with the Sri Lankan authorities to relocate shipping lanes on the south coast. Fatal collisions have nearly doubled in the past 40 years, causing local blue whale populations to drop by more than 50%.

Watch the video above to see how whales can be protected from collisions with ships.

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Can Minnesota Make Change for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women? https://peet-corso.cz/can-minnesota-make-change-for-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 17:06:28 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/can-minnesota-make-change-for-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women/ Since mid-2020, more than a thousand low-income families have brought their sick and ailing pets to the nonprofit Pet Support Space, housed in a small Los Angeles storefront. A 14-year-old dog had a tumor that a vet estimated it would cost $ 5,000 to remove. A four-year-old pitbull had been vomiting for days, a cat’s […]]]>

Since mid-2020, more than a thousand low-income families have brought their sick and ailing pets to the nonprofit Pet Support Space, housed in a small Los Angeles storefront. A 14-year-old dog had a tumor that a vet estimated it would cost $ 5,000 to remove. A four-year-old pitbull had been vomiting for days, a cat’s painful bladder stones required surgery, a pug was limping from foxtail embedded in its paw. Skin and ear infections abounded. Neither the animal’s problems nor their owners’ inability to help them came as a surprise.

A recent national study found that nearly 28% of households with pets faced barriers to veterinary care, with finances being the most common reason. In low-income households, researchers have found that financial and housing insecurity can increase the chances that animals will not receive the care they need. Sociologist Arnold Arluke, author of The Outsiders: Pets, People and Poverty estimates that 66% of pets in poverty have never seen a vet at all.

The “why” behind these numbers is complex. Of course, money is the main problem. Veterinary care is expensive. A majority of practitioners work in for-profit clinics, consolidation in the industry has placed more emphasis on profit margins, and vet prices have increased faster than the overall inflation rate. This includes exams starting at $ 50, dental cleaning from $ 70 to $ 400, and blood tests and x-rays at $ 80-250. If a dog breaks a leg or eats a sock, surgery costs to start four digits.

High prices are not necessarily linked to greed. Michael Blackwell, former deputy director of the Center for Veterinary Medicine at the FDA, is the chair of the Access to Veterinary Care Coalition (AVCC) which was formed in 2016 to study this problem. Veterinary training, he said, teaches vets to practice a “gold standard” of care, which means performing all possible diagnostic tests and pursuing all treatment options, even when the budget is short. ‘a customer is limited. (Many pet owners are unaware that they can refuse a recommended procedure, such as a blood test, and even fewer are willing to refuse care for fear of looking heartless.)

Some private vets are offering discounts to troubled clients, added Jeremy Prupas, DVM, the City of Los Angeles chief veterinarian, but they themselves have an average debt of $ 150,000 in student loans, so they “simply cannot bear the immense need existing on their own.” Telling clients that you can’t help them because they don’t have the money is a leading cause of burnout in the veterinary profession, according to Prupas. Pet insurance can help cover costs, but requires monthly premiums and comes with such a complex array of deductibles, co-payments, limits, and exclusions that a practical guide recommends d ” hire a lawyer to examine the police. Credit cards designed for financing medical care, if one can qualify, can carry punitive interest rates as high as 26.99 percent.

Equally critical is a long-term failure on the part of the animal welfare movement to consider, let alone prioritize, the needs of low-income pet owners. Since the 1990s, the rescue / humanitarian community has invested enormous sums of money and energy into ending euthanasia in shelters through adoption, but much less in helping those who have not. money to take care of their pets. “If you can’t afford an animal,” the thought was saying, “then you shouldn’t have one. “

“Until recently, our focus was on shelter challenges,” said Amanda Arrington, senior director of the Humane Society’s Pets for Life program in the United States, which helps low-income pet owners. “There was a lot of judgment and determination on who or not deserved support and resources that was swayed by what I think is swayed by a lot of society, namely classism and racism. We have confused the lack of finance and access with how much someone loves or wants to take care of their pet.

In fact, owners can be punished for not being able to afford veterinary care – “most cases of human neglect arise from the inability to care for a pet,” he said. declared Prupas. In Michigan, for example, failure to provide an animal with adequate care, including medical attention, is an offense punishable by 93 days in jail and / or a fine of up to $ 1,000. With a second offense, it becomes a crime.

The distorted belief that “these people” don’t care about their pets has never been true.

What exists for pet owners living in poverty is a patchwork of low-cost care options, ranging from local efforts – like Emancipet in Texas and the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society – to well-funded national companies like Pets for Life, which operates in several dozen cities. The vast majority, however, only offer basic services like sterilization, vaccination, and flea treatment. “We are not a full-service veterinary clinic and do not treat sick or injured pets,” warns a low-cost option on its website. Another suggests those in need travel, as “small town vets may charge lower fees” or start a GoFundMe. As a result, many types of care are largely unavailable: emergency care (by some estimates one in three animals will be in urgent need each year), management of chronic diseases such as diabetes or kidney disease, medication, dental care (dental disease may affect 80 percent of older dogs) and the mercy of humane euthanasia (which can cost anywhere from $ 50 to $ 300).

The final element of the care gap is a practical and cultural disconnect. Because many economically disadvantaged neighborhoods are ‘veterinary deserts’, with few or no practitioners, finding care is not easy, and reaching it may require arguing with an unhappy animal from a distance and / or organize private transport. Keeping an appointment at an office with weekday hours only or a clinic once a month can mean losing a day’s pay. Paperwork raises concerns about immigration status inquiries. The veterinary profession also remains one of the whitest in the country: just as people who feel alienated or unwanted do not use human health care options, Arluke pointed out, they do not use care for their animals. of company.

The result has been painful: more directly for animals that remain untreated, die from what vets call “economic euthanasia” (slaughtering an animal because the treatment is too expensive), or end up in shelters. Fear of an impending vet bill and the mistaken belief that all animals in shelters are receiving medical attention are a major cause of owner surrender.

But people also pay.

Some sick animals can infect their humans. Roundworms, for example, can pass through contact with animal feces and cause lung, heart and eye problems. Blackwell reports meeting an optometrist who practices in a low-income Florida community who has seen an increasing number of children with roundworm larvae in their eyes.

The psychological toll is just as real. Poor families who love their pets and for whom they “provide an emotional core and perhaps one of the only sources of joy” face “mental and emotional” devastation due to the unimaginable choice to weigh that love against. potential financial ruin, Blackwell said. Professor Katja M. Guenther, author of The life and death of refuge animals, called the severing of an animal-human bond “a kind of community violence” in a 2021 webinar.

Change seems more and more possible. Covid-19 and the country’s recent racial and economic calculus have prompted aid organizations to examine their assumptions and prejudices about who has the “right” to pet love, and, Arrington said, it is increasingly recognized that “racial and economic injustice does have an impact on animal welfare.” Meanwhile, AlignCare, a new program from Michael Blackwell’s Program for Pet Health Equity, is trying to create a national model of something like Medicaid for Pets. As part of the program, families who are already in difficulty (because they participate in the SNAP program or a similar program) and who seek help at a shelter or veterinary clinic will be registered and matched with a veterinary social worker or to a support coordinator. They will then be referred to a veterinarian who has agreed to offer preventive, dental and even critical care, for a reduced rate; AlignCare will pay 80 percent of the cost. After three years of pilot programs in 10 disparate communities, he’s tackling his biggest challenge yet, Los Angeles, where one in five people live in poverty.

AlignCare will not offer “gold standard” care, instead focusing on preventive, progressive and cost-effective measures (such as offering telehealth appointments and limiting diagnoses that will not change treatment options. ) when possible. But it will expand the human safety net to include the animals that most of us now see as part of our families. And while the effort is currently funded by grants from Maddie’s Fund, Duffield Foundation, and Petsmart Charities, Blackwell’s goal is “community ownership”: the combined involvement of local vets, animal services across the country. city, social service agencies, rescue and community organizations, manufacturers of pet food and products, and wealthy pet owners can make the model stand-alone.

There is no perfect solution for low-income pet owners who need help accessing veterinary care. But growing awareness of the problem is a big step forward. “What we call ‘animal welfare’ is changing,” said Lori Weise, whose nonprofit, Downtown Dog Rescue, manages the Pet Support Space. “The distorted belief that ‘these people’ don’t care about their pets has never been true. People cannot afford medical care. Sometimes they don’t even know what’s there; themselves have never been hospitalized. As more and more people are brought into the system, we will see the first generation receiving proper veterinary care. “

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There is a need to move the Sacramento Zoo to Elk Grove https://peet-corso.cz/there-is-a-need-to-move-the-sacramento-zoo-to-elk-grove/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/there-is-a-need-to-move-the-sacramento-zoo-to-elk-grove/ OPINION AND COMMENT Editorials and other Opinion content offer perspectives on issues important to our community and are independent of the work of our newsroom journalists. The Sacramento Zoo has been part of William Land Park since 1927. Much of its main infrastructure, like its three iconic mid-century modern entrance buildings built in 1961, is […]]]>

OPINION AND COMMENT

Editorials and other Opinion content offer perspectives on issues important to our community and are independent of the work of our newsroom journalists.

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The Sacramento Zoo has been part of William Land Park since 1927. Much of its main infrastructure, like its three iconic mid-century modern entrance buildings built in 1961, is 60 to 90 years old. A larger, modern zoo would also serve the people of this region better.

Sacramento Bee File

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Move the zoo to Elk Grove?

The city of Elk Grove plans to build a modern Sacramento Regional Zoo from the ground up – the country’s first new zoo since the Indianapolis Zoo in 1988, a key consultant on the project said.


Modern zoos perform essential roles in the communities they serve. They provide a meaningful connection between people, animals and nature; they educate and inspire people to care about animals and have empathy for animals; and they advocate for the protection and conservation of wildlife both locally and globally. Our region and the animals deserve a modern zoo.

The city of Sacramento operated the zoo until the 1990s, when the zoo’s accreditation by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums was threatened due to inadequate staff and antiquated facilities. In 1997, the nonprofit Sacramento Zoological Society took over the day-to-day management of the zoo and ran it as a nonprofit model, focusing on animal welfare, education, and conservation. Nonetheless, it has become increasingly clear that in order to have a viable zoo that meets the needs of animals and the expectations of the public, the zoo needs more space and modern facilities.

Today’s conversation about building a new zoo in Elk Grove is not a new or unexpected idea. Instead, it’s the culmination of decades of efforts to meet the zoo’s undeniable need for more space.

The zoo is 95 years old. Over the decades, the search for more space has included discussions of expanding within Land Park as well as building a new zoo in another part of the city of Sacramento. The city’s most recent feasibility study, the first to be undertaken in about 10 years, focused on the same categories of options and concluded that none of these options for a larger zoo are viable.

During this time, the Zoological Society made many difficult choices in managing their limited space. In addition to the cramped quarters, the zoo’s main infrastructure is 60 to 90 years old and failing.

Animals like the tiger, hippo, and grizzly bear – animals the community expects to see at the zoo and need the support of accredited zoos – will never return due to the physical limitations of the current site. Also, while we provide excellent care for the animals that currently live at the zoo, it is undeniable that with more space and modern facilities, we could provide them with better lives and do more to protect wildlife.

Of course, a larger, modern zoo would also serve the people of this region better. Without parking and with limited accessibility to public transportation, the current zoo site fundamentally undermines our educational mission and limits our ability to generate the income necessary to support our operations and conservation efforts. There is a critical need for zoos to support populations of rare and threatened species and to serve as partners for conservation programs globally. The zoo’s ability to generate income is also important because the Sacramento Zoo – unlike almost every other municipal zoos in this country – relies almost entirely on private donations and visitor income from admissions, concessions and sales of goods to finance its operations.

The proposed site identified by the Town of Elk Grove would address these long-standing needs and challenges, providing sufficient land to support current conservation efforts as well as to expand them. The new site would also offer greater accessibility to the entire region, with dedicated parking and facilities to support public transport and school group visits. That’s why we’re excited to explore this possibility with Elk Grove over the next few months.

The Sacramento Zoo is, and always will be, a regional zoo, welcoming more than half a million visitors from across Northern California and western Nevada each year. Our region deserves a new, modern zoo with a greater capacity to educate and inspire future generations about animals and nature, which is vital for our quality of life. This is why we are committed to doing everything in our power to create a quality zoo that serves our region, its residents and its animals.

Jason Jacobs is the Executive Director of the Sacramento Zoo. Elizabeth Stallard is Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Sacramento Zoological Society.

Elizabeth stallard
Elizabeth Stallard is Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Sacramento Zoological Society. Elizabeth stallard

Jason jacobs
Jason Jacobs is the Executive Director of the Sacramento Zoo. Jason jacobs

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Eliza Newlin Carney: The Civic Power of Charity – Rochester Minnesota news, weather, sports https://peet-corso.cz/eliza-newlin-carney-the-civic-power-of-charity-rochester-minnesota-news-weather-sports/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 23:02:47 +0000 https://peet-corso.cz/eliza-newlin-carney-the-civic-power-of-charity-rochester-minnesota-news-weather-sports/ From omicron infections to weather disasters, gun deaths to economic uncertainty, congressional deadlock to lingering threats to democracy, Americans arguably have more to worry about than celebrating this holiday season. . Yet bad times also have a way of bringing out the best in people, and nowhere is this more evident than in the charitable […]]]>

From omicron infections to weather disasters, gun deaths to economic uncertainty, congressional deadlock to lingering threats to democracy, Americans arguably have more to worry about than celebrating this holiday season. .

Yet bad times also have a way of bringing out the best in people, and nowhere is this more evident than in the charitable sector. Charitable giving in the United States reached a record high of $ 471.4 billion in 2020, a 5.1% increase from the previous year, driven by concerns among Americans about the pandemic, the hardships economic and racial justice.

“Giving is an important measure of civic participation, a way to build the kind of society we want to live in,” Asha Curran, co-founder and CEO of GivingTuesday, told The Chronicle of Philanthropy.

GivingTuesday, the World Giving Day launched in 2012, grossed Americans $ 2.7 billion this year, a 9% increase from last year. Said Curran of the increase, “Our hope is that this outpouring of generosity is an inspiration to continue to give, to show kindness and to recognize our shared humanity every day of the year.”

The picture is not all rosy for charities, of course. More than half of the nation’s roughly 1.8 million nonprofits (57%) cut their overall spending in 2020, according to the Independent Sector, and the nonprofit workforce lost 1, 6 million jobs.

Donations increased for nonprofits focused on human needs, racial inequalities, and environmental and animal organizations, but were dropped for arts, culture and the humanities groups. Almost half (47%) of nonprofits reported serving fewer people by the end of 2020.

Yet charities continue to demonstrate the power of individual Americans, both through charitable giving and volunteer hours, to help solve massive problems that there is little the government can do to solve.

From public health and poverty crises triggered by the pandemic to global warming and disaster relief, social justice, animal welfare and the arts, Americans are donating millions of dollars and billions of dollars. volunteer hours to help each other, often neighbor to neighbor. On GivingTuesday, volunteering was also up 11% from 2020, and donations of food, clothing and other goods were up 8%.

For Americans wondering where their charitable money could go the most, there is no shortage of guides, lists and leaderboards. According to Forbes, the top three charities in the country are United Way Worldwide, Feeding America, and The Salvation Army. But there are literally millions of local and civic groups, hundreds of them with tiny budgets, working to help their communities.

A “how to help” guide offered by CNN provides an overview of the diverse world of nonprofits across the country, including the Broadway Cares and Actors Fund groups, which provide financial assistance to struggling artists. The New York Times Holiday Giving Guide 2021 features a series of articles from opinion writers on their favorite charities. For those who wish to research charities on their own, Candid collects and disseminates comprehensive data on the nonprofit sector.

Here are a few nonprofit success stories that demonstrate the civic power of charities in 2021.

  • After tornadoes killed 90 people and displaced hundreds across the South and Midwest earlier this month, Jim Finch of Clarksville, Tennessee, traveled with his meat smoker to hard-hit Mayfield, in Kentucky, to feed hurricane victims with barbecue chicken, burgers and soybeans. pancakes. Said Karen Smith, Kentucky coordinator for Southern Baptist Disaster Relief, which has gathered volunteers for brush clearing and meal deliveries, “We want to give people hope. You watch it all, and it’s hopeless. I think if they have hope then they can start to heal.
  • Amid the food shortages caused by the pandemic, WhyHunger created a participatory map that identified free meal sites in the United States and parts of the world. The World Central Kitchen has distributed more than 300 million meals in some 400 cities across the country, according to CNN. Collecting, preparing and distributing food is a major voluntary activity in the United States.
  • Teresa Dilka, a 68-year-old retired nurse from Colorado, used to donate to the Food Bank in the Rockies, but now that her income has shrunk, she volunteers there instead. “Sometimes it seems like it helps me more than I help them,” Dilka told The Chronicle of Philanthropy. “It feels good to be able to help. About 1 in 4 of American volunteers, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, donate service hours in the billions.

National leaders have long appreciated the essential social role of the charitable sector, both civic and monetary. Nonprofits contributed $ 1.2 trillion to the economy in 2020, according to Independent Sector. As President George HW Bush said when he first awarded more than 1,000 volunteers “points of light” in 1990, the capacity of government is limited, “but the potential of the American people is unclear. no limits “.

Eliza Newlin Carney is a journalist and founder of The Civic Circle, which uses the arts to empower young students to understand and participate in democracy.

© 2021 The Point of Support
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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